Recorded Webinar: The Transfer of Partnership Interests: Key Stamp Duty Imperatives

 

12th February 2019

Duration:  approx. 2 hour

 ABOUT THE WEBINAR
Recent case law developments shine a light on transfer of partnership interests attracting stamp duty liability. This session brings you up to date, including:

  • Dutiable interest and partnership – Danvest v Commissioner of State Revenue (2017) VSCA 382
  • Comparison between states on transfer of interest in partnership – is Victoria alone?
  • Where freehold land is a partnership asset – a state comparison
  • Does a partner have a proprietary interest in assets of partnership?
  • The necessity of equitable proprietary interest to attract liability
  • Assessing landholder duty on acquisition of a company or unit trust that is a partner
 PRESENTER
Our presenter

John Riley, Partner, MinterEllison, Melbourne 

John is a taxation law specialist with particular expertise in state taxes, including stamp duty, land tax and the Victorian Growth Areas Infrastructure Contribution.

His practice spans a wide range of industries, including property, infrastructure, energy and resources. John has acted for various listed and unlisted entities in relation to the stamp duty and income tax implications of group restructures; property, infrastructure and business acquisitions and disposals; and listed and unlisted syndications. John’s work also covers property developments, land sales and acquisitions; and financing arrangements.

 WHO SHOULD ATTEND?

This webinar is suitable for lawyers and accountants advising on stamp duty – Australia wide. This webinar is for practitioners with some knowledge in this area and looking to improve their knowledge.

 ENQUIRIES/ASSISTANCE
If you need assistance or have an enquiry, please do not hesitate to contact our Webinar Coordinator, Lisa Tran on (03) 8601 7709 or email: lisa@tved.net.au
Product Code: WBJFEB19
 Price:  $264.00 (Inclusive of GST)
© 2019 Television Education Network Pty Ltd. All rights reserved. The program for this webinar is copyright and may not be reproduced in any form without the prior written consent of the copyright owner.